Nest Cam Outdoor – My experiences

So a couple of months ago some bastard keyed my car. My initial knee jerk reaction was to buy a CCTV camera to watch over it in case it happened again, so I knew who’s knees to break. So the search began, but I wanted something fast.

I looked at a couple of offerings but I wanted something easy and quick to install, and preferably without too many cables to run around the house. I settled in the Nest Cam Outdoor, after owning their thermostat for a year and being very pleased with its performance and functionality.

When the camera arrived it was very well packaged with the usual plethora of mounting hardware. The kit comes with long enough cables for most installations and all the required fixing hardware, including cable clips, which was nice.

The mounting system for the camera uses strong magnets to hold it in place. While this is a novel idea, in practice a well-aimed football will knock the camera off the wall and render it useless. Points lost there unfortunately.

The cable attached to the nest has a ruggedized USB connector on it that’s approximately 18mm diameter. All well and good until you need to run it through a wall. I know this camera is meant for American homes which I presume mostly have outdoor power outlets, but that’s an uncommon facility in the UK. Drilling an 18mm+ hole in a double skinned brick wall is no simple task. More points lost there.

Once installed the camera is easy to set up using the Nest iOS or Android apps. Scan the bar code on the app and away you go. Don’t forget you’ll need a constant internet connection for the camera to work though.

The video quality of the camera even in daylight is shit considering it is allegedly 1080p. While the camera sensor probably is 1080p, the camera compressed the nuts off the video to upload it to Google’s cloud platform, losing most of the quality. I honestly can’t even read the number plate of my car from the video, and the car is parked maybe 15 feet from the camera, if that. Image quality is even worse at night.

Remember Google’s server I just mentioned? They only allow the camera to store 3 hours of footage, unless you buy a Nest Aware subscription to store up to 10 days, or 30 days, whichever tickles your fancy. This isn’t particularly well communicated by Nest either, to the point that when my “Free Trial” expired, I didn’t even get a notification to say “Hey, your camera has just deleted all video over three hours old! Best break the credit card out!” Thinking about this logically, if somebody broke into my car between 1am and 3am, I wouldn’t have any footage of it at all. What’s the point?

In conclusion, don’t buy this camera. It’s effectively a glorified, very expensive, video doorbell without a subscription, which wouldn’t be as bad if the cost of the camera wasn’t so fucking much to start with. Even then, you can’t make out facial features unless the camera is installed at a level where the magnets make it easy to sabotage. Again, what’s the point?

Honestly. Don’t waste your money. This device has the potential to be awesome, but is used as a cash cow by Nest instead.

Tip For Working From Home

Some people have the fortune of being able to work from home as part of their employment. Working from home, or telecommuting, can be extremely productive for a lot of people. It can also be counter productive if you’re not experienced at telecommuting. As a regular home worker, I have learned a lot of ways to make the valuable, non-interrupted time as productive as possible.

Routine

It’s important to keep your usual morning routine (apart from the travelling to the office part, obviously) to help switch your brain to work mode. Lounging around in your dressing gown with your laptop is something you can do on a Sunday morning, and you’ll struggle to associate the time with work.

My normal morning routine looks something like this:

  • 6:00 – Alarm goes off.
  • 6:05 – Have a cuppa and breakfast with the wife and kids.
  • 6:30 – Shepherd the kids into their uniforms for school.
  • 7:00 – Get a shower and get dressed for work.
  • 7:20 – Shepherd the kids into coats and shoes ready to leave.
  • 7:30 – Leave to drop the kids off at various locations.
  • 7:50 – Leave the hometown en route to work.
  • 8:20 – Arrive at work.

My “working from home” routine is pretty much the sames:

  • 6:00 – Alarm goes off.
  • 6:05 – Have a cuppa and breakfast with the wife and kids.
  • 6:30 – Shepherd the kids into their uniforms for school.
  • 7:00 – Get a shower and get dressed for work.
  • 7:20 – Shepherd the kids into coats and shoes ready to leave.
  • 7:30 – Leave to drop the kids off at various locations.
  • 7:55 – Arrive back home ready for a day of work.

Since I usually wear a work branded polo shirt and jeans for work, I usually just wear them when working from home. Your mileage may vary if you have to wear a suite though.

Workspace

It’s important to have somewhere to work from while telecommuting. Sitting on your sofa with your laptop might seem like a great idea, but take it from me, you will soon get too comfortable and start slouching. Then you start to become distracted and turn the TV on. This is fine if you can work like that, but I bet your productivity is affected.

The best scenario is having a desk and a comfortable office chair to sit in, preferably in a different room to the hustle and bustle of your house, if there are other family members home. If you don’t have a desk, the dining table is a good alternative, providing enough space to spread your work out a little and key coffee cup support within arms reach.

Connectivity

The vast majority of work is performed on laptops these days. Unless you are simply writing a proposal and you don’t need internet connectivity, then you need to think about connectivity.

In some cases, a straight WiFi connection will suffice for access to emails and the internet, but you might need to consider access to internal business systems. Since each company is different, contact you ICT department to find out what options are available to connect to the resources you require for your job.

The company I work for offer a device called a Teleworkers Gateway. This device plugs into my own router and gives me the options of either a “work” WiFi connection, or a cabled Ethernet connection. They also offer a software VPN solution but the Teleworkers Gateway is the simpler and more convenient option.

Welfare

The beauty of working from home is having unlimited coffee without feeling obliged to make one for everybody else in your office each time. Just make sure you stop for lunch at your normal time.

Another benefit of working from home is your bed. Seriously. Feeling a bit burnt out by lunchtime? Have a 45 minute nap. You’ll be nice and refreshed and more productive in the afternoon.

Moderation

Like all good things, telecommuting should be used in moderation if it isn’t your primary working arrangement. Working from home is great when you need to focus on a particular task without the interruptions of the office. Do it too much though, and people get used to you not being in the office and start calling, emailing and instant messaging you more, thus increasing the interruptions you were trying to avoid.